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Your Pisces Child

Your Pisces Child

Our Sun sign, and those of our children, represents the fundamental sense of self, as separate and distinct from others. Like the planets in our solar system all revolve around the Sun, it is where all the various parts of ourselves come together and form our identity. By knowing your child’s chart, you can see how best to teach them healthy patterns and behavior in all areas in their life. Let’s look at a practical breakdown of the ways a Pisces child sees the world and how best to help them. This is the ninth article in my series on Children’s Astrology for Better Way Mom’s on Conscious Parenting. Pisces birthdays begin February 18th at 04:25 pm PST, and 07:25 pm EST. (If this description does not accurately describe your Pisces child, there may be strong modifiers coming from other planets or sensitive points in the Natal chart which can overshadow Pisces characteristics). Pisces (February 18 – March 20) Pisces symbolizes that which is most ephemeral in human nature, the desire to unite with the infinite cosmic consciousness. It represents the urge toward self-sacrifice to a Higher Cause and the soul’s struggle with the imperfections of the world. Its image of two fish swimming in opposite directions suggest the dichotomy embodied in the mix of the material and spiritual realms. Pisces sun babies are born flower children who want life to be beautiful, serene, loving and peaceful. Loud noises and angry faces terrify them. This is a highly sensitive baby who needs lots of love and affection from the moment of birth. After the safety and warmth of the watery womb, Pisces finds life to be a shock and needs time to adjust. Pisces Sun will bond to Mother and hate to be apart from this island of security in a scary world. Tears of anguish may arise when safety is threatened. Boys are no exception. Parents need early to instill a sense of security in their Pisces Sun child. Pisces is a psychic sponge and picks up all sorts of feelings and information, but may have trouble sorting it all out. As a result, they often don’t know the difference between their own feelings and what they are picking up from other people and other realms. They will pick up on parental moods easily so it is important to keep tabs on your emotional energy and not bring...

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Your Aquarius Child

Your Aquarius Child

No amount of parental guidance can supercede the knowledge of your child’s natal chart. The information provided, once understood, can empower your ability to guide your child, based on their unique personality, in a specific way which appeals to their intrinsic nature and as such ensures a much better overall outcome. This is the eighth article in our series on Children’s Astrology. Aquarius birthdays begin January 20th at 02:19 am PST, and 05:19 am EST. (If this description does not accurately describe your Aquarius child, there may be strong modifiers coming from other planets or sensitive points in the Natal chart which can overshadow Aquarius characteristics.) Aquarius (January 20 – February 18) Aquarius represents the idea of the individual as a cooperative member of a larger whole. This promotes their understanding that all humanity is family. This is a concept that the Aquarian grasps intuitively. They can be quirky, independent, yet inventive, intelligent, friendly and loyal. The Aquarian purpose is to experiment with all established structures, cross all manmade boundaries and experience the unique, new and unusual. Aquarius Sun babies have a quality of unpredictability. They may suddenly cease to respond to a regular routine of feeding and sleeping, causing much concern. The answer here may be to change the routine, as Aquarius follows inner patterns of response. Experimentation will likely provide the solution. Aquarius likes new things and new ideas and will evidence a free spirit quite early, making it easy for a parent to feel rejected. At an age when other children cling to their parents, this youngster may show a preference for independence. Often there is a sudden dislike of what was pleasing yesterday, but don’t take it personally. It’s just Aquarius Sun’s natural nonconforming nature at work. Objective and logical, Aquarius has a mental approach to life and therefore school rarely presents difficulty. In fact, in kindergarten they may well show surprising independence and resent being escorted to school! This is an individualistic youngster — unconventional, unique, valuing the freedom to do and go without restriction. This child will bring home unusual friends, and pets. Patience on the part of more orthodox parents is necessary in order to avoid alienating the child, who may be labeled a rebel. But forcing conformity will only backfire. Aquarius will simply conceal forbidden activities. Guidance is necessary, and though coercion won’t work, appealing to logic and reasonableness will. They may...

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Your Capricorn Child

Your Capricorn Child

While there are many philosophies on child development and parenting, bottom line, we need to know what really works and how we can help our little ones develop socially, emotionally, physically and spiritually. Astrology provides that personal factor. There is no better information to assist a parent then an understanding of a child’s astrological makeup. It is a child development strategy written specifically for your unique son or daughter. Every parent wants to do what is best for their child. Astrology can give you the insight you need. This is the seventh article in our series on Children’s Astrology. Capricorn birthdays begin December 21st at 03:39 pm PST, and 06:39 pm EST. (If this description does not accurately describe your Capricorn child, there may be strong modifiers coming from other planets or sensitive points in the Natal chart which can overshadow Capricorn characteristics.) Capricorn (December 21 – January 20) Capricorn Sun babies are serious and responsible even when very small. Infants can look prematurely wise and solemn, like little old people. They seem to be adults who are working their way backward to childhood and can act in astonishingly mature ways at a very young age, assuming responsibilities and giving advice to elders. Capricorn may develop a quirky sense of humor in order to compensate for an overly serious approach to life. As soon as Capricorns can walk and talk, they want to be helpful and do something important and may carry on surprisingly adult conversations with those who offer guidance. Because of all this seriousness, young Capricorn needs to be encouraged to play. Forms of play that teach while reaching a practical result are the best. Evan at play, they will give off the concentrated air of an adult busy at real work. School is often approached in an organized fashion and their ambition will surface in the school years where goal-oriented Capricorn will work very hard to excel. Praise is not very important to the Capricorn student, but recognition and respect for real achievements is vital. Since they tend to focus on establishment-oriented topics and time-tested methods, Capricorns favor politics and history. Reading about successful people serves as inspiration. They will usually excel in those subjects that have a practical end, leaving the fantasy to others. Though Capricorn children enjoy being taken seriously and given responsibility, when the burden becomes too great they notice other children don’t...

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Siblings Baby, Siblings

After many months of post-partum depression and anxiety, things are getting better. Yeah, everyone said that things would get better with time, but you know, people are full of you-know-what sometimes– either that, or I have to figure things out for myself. I don’t know if some switch flipped when Baby Girl turned one, or perhaps it was the dramatic and long-awaited return of a long-lost aunt who used to visit me monthly but had been noticeably absent since November of 2008. Her advent sent me into an Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret-esque glee, prompting me to share this news with pretty much anyone and everyone. Good times. I heart Judy Blume. So, armed with the hope of the possible regulation of the hormonal mayhem that had overtaken my body for the past few months, perhaps I’m seeing the world through different eyes. I see my kids starting to play together — I mean, really play together — and I have a glimpse of what they may be doing in the years to come. Yes, Big Brother still decks her, kicks her, pushes her over, and grabs stuff out of her hands, but the funny thing is that Baby Girl is starting to give it out, too. Of course I don’t condone violence, but I have to chuckle when I see her grab hold of fistfuls of her brother’s luscious locks (and they are pretty damn luscious, if I do say so myself) and yank away, only to have him wail, “She’s pulling my hair! Noooo! I don’t like that when you do that!” Ahhh, God bless preschool for teaching these kids how to use their words. *smile* Too bad that the girl doesn’t understand a damn thing and keeps yanking away. She’s also figuring out the whole cause-and-effect thing and will look one of us dead in the eye, grin from ear to ear, and grab her brother’s elaborate truck and train formations, as if to say, “Look at me! I have power… bwa ha ha HA!” Cheeky. And the girl has also found her voice. Sure, she’s still mostly laidback, but she will let.you.know. if she objects or doesn’t want to do something: get in the carseat, sit in the highchair, you name it. Well, it’s good for a girl to have a voice these days. But really, it’s fabulous to watch them play together. Sure, she...

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I Want My Daughter to Become a Princess – a Bad-Ass Princess

When I was a little girl, I wanted to be in the ice capades. Not because I wanted to ice skate with Big Bird and Elmo and Cinderella, but because I really wanted to wear the fancy headdresses. Every once in awhile I would try to dress up. By dress up I mean dress like a girl. A girly girl.  You know, “skirts” and “tops” and “shoes that match purses” and “makeup”. Sadly, I think the pinnacle of my fashion career was in third grade when I insisted on wearing the same red and purple striped dress every day. (I only got to wear it every other day, because Mom wanted to wash it in between wearings. Hmph.) By high school I had resigned myself to pink umbros, t-shirts from my best friend’s father’s construction company, and Birkenstocks.It was not a good look, and definitely not girly. Or princessy. Things didn’t get much better through high school and college, but over time I got more comfortable in my own skin. I came to realize, and mostly accept, that I will never ever be able to get my hair to look like it does when I leave the salon. (Which is ok, really, because I only get my hair cut every six months or so.) I still can’t figure out how to wear a blazer (or if blazers are even in style any more). I don’t know how to shop for clothes, and I’m not very good at wearing them. I wore clogs to work. Every day. Speaking of which, one of the best parts about having left my full time job is getting to wear yoga pants and jeans every day. And now I have a daughter. A stunningly beautiful two-year-old who is becoming increasingly girly. We buy her trucks, she wants to feed baby. I try to build towers with her, she wants to push her dolls around in the stroller. She spent a couple of weeks obsessed with wearing bows in her hair, and she loves wearing dresses. Her relationship with shoes can only be described as a compulsion. Here’s the thing. I don’t have a problem with my daughter becoming a girly-girl. I don’t even mind if she gets into Princesses and Fairies (because at least that would mean she was watching TV, right, and that would be, well, great). I know, I shouldn’t say this....

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All We Need Is Love?

All We Need Is Love?

The concept of Love is fascinating to me.  We “love” so many things, our parents, our kids, our job, The Vampire Diaries, pie, sleep. How is it possible to use that word so freely about so many different things? I actually counted how many times I said the word today and I lost track around 24 (while I was eating guacamole at Rosa Mexicana incidentally).  How can the same word be used for how we feel about our kids and chocolate? I decided to look up the definition of love on Wikipedia, since I don’t have a dictionary anywhere in my house. I was confident it would say something like “wake up people, the word love should only be used when referring to your kids, husband or wife and in most, but certainly not all cases, your parents.” As defined in Wikipedia: The word love can refer to a variety of different feelings, states, and attitudes, ranging from generic pleasure (“I loved that meal”) to intense interpersonal attraction (“I love my wife”). “Love” can also refer specifically to the passionate desire and intimacy of romantic love, to the sexual love of eros (cf. Greek words for love), to the emotional closeness of familial love, or to the platonic love that defines friendship, to the profound oneness or devotion of religious love. This diversity of uses and meanings, combined with the complexity of the feelings involved, makes love unusually difficult to consistently define, even compared to other emotional states. Not Helpful. We really are forced to use the all purpose love for everything, because none of the other words (like adore, worship, blahblah) really work as well. That sort of cracks my whole notion of what the word love should be reserved for. OK, so here we go, we apparently don’t have a choice but to help our kids navigate the use of the word love. The tricky part for parents then becomes figuring out how to teach them that it could be perfectly acceptable to love the Last Call sale at Nieman Marcus more than their Great Aunt June, without turning them into cold sociopaths. And that seeing Bon Jovi in concert could be described as falling in love for the first time, because it could be. So is this the root of why we end up at the shrink? We are told to think about what you say...

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